9 Design Moves the Property Brothers Always Do—and Why You Should, Too

It’s been a big year for Drew and Jonathan Scott. They premiered their new HGTV show, “Celebrity IOU,” starred in Season 3 of their hit show “The Property Brothers: Forever Home,” and even have a new season of “Brother vs. Brother”—coming soon!

And while the brothers are always taking risks and trying out new styles, it’s clear that they have some go-to renovation tricks and style choices that give their projects that signature “Property Brothers” style.

Read on to find out which looks the brothers love best, and maybe you’ll be inspired to bring some of these designs into your home.

1. They install two-tone kitchen cabinets

Drew and Jonathan love tying bold colors into their kitchen renovations—but they’re careful not to go overboard with too much of a good thing. That’s why they often choose two-tone cabinets.

Light-toned cabinets allow a kitchen to look fresh, while cabinets with bolder tones allow for some contrast and personality.

Sometimes Drew and Jonathan choose to put the accent cabinets on the kitchen island, other times they go with white uppers and dark lowers. Either way, this colorful style always look incredible.

See the rest here!

Baker House From Final Season of ‘Fixer Upper’ Is the Week’s Most Popular Home

The multitalented power couple Chip and Joanna Gaines have the Midas touch—and they’ve struck again. Featured on “Fixer Upper,” the Patti Baker house is back on the market and racking up clicks like crazy.

It’s listed for $359,500, and it’s this week’s most popular home on realtor.com®.

Magnolia Nation first fell in love with the house when Chip and Joanna gave it a makeover during the final season of their HGTV hit show.

It came on the market in 2018, shortly after an episode about its renovation appeared on the show. Still filled with plenty of the desirable Gaines aesthetic, it’s now available for another buyer who’s wild about Waco.

Besides the Baker House, this week’s list was crammed with off-the-wall dream properties.

Want to live in Phoenix in a 11,000-square-foot brownstone with a French chateau vibe? Check.

In search of a self-sustaining homestead in Illinois? We’ve got you covered.

Or if you’ve always dreamed of living like James Bond … but in Los Angeles? If you have $62 million to spare, there’s a mega property that’s shaken, not stirred, and hovering over the city.

But even if you don’t have tens of millions to spend, there’s something for nearly everyone with this week’s most popular properties. Scroll on down and enjoy!

See all of the homes Here

What disclosures do sellers need to make when selling?

A: Sellers, through various forms and reports, disclose any conditions known to them which might negatively affect the value and desirability of the property for a prospective buyer.

Mandated property disclosures include:

  • The Transfer Disclosure Statement (TDS): As the seller of a one-to-four unit residential property, you are required to furnish prospective buyers with a TDS setting forth the physical conditions and any other value-affecting facts regarding the property, its improvements and its surrounding area. The TDS is handed to prospective buyers as soon as practicable (ASAP) — when negotiations to purchase your property commence.
  • The Natural Hazard Disclosure (NHD) Statement:The NHD statement is a mandated form prepared by a third-party NHD expert used by you and your agent to disclose public-ably available natural hazard information such as potential flooding, fire hazards and earthquake fault zones.
  • The Lead-Based Paint (LBP) disclosure: The federal LBP disclosure form is required for all pre-1978 residential construction. LBP disclosure rules set forth the requirements for you to disclose any known LBP hazards and the buyer’s right to investigate them.

You may obtain additional reports to best disclose your property’s conditions to a prospective buyer. These reports, which your seller’s agent will advise you about, provide additional information to include in the TDS:

  • The Home Inspection Report (HIR): A home inspectorconducts a physical examination of your property to determine the condition of its components and systems. On completion of their examination, they hand you an HIR on their observations and findings. In turn, you use the HIR to prepare your TDS, and then attach it to the TDS to avoid claims of misrepresentation against you and your agent.
  • A Structural Pest Control (SPC) report: A report disclosing the existence of termites or structural damage due to a termite or fungal infestation.
  • Whether you or the buyer will pay for corrective actions and repairs outlined in the SPC report is negotiated between you and the buyer in the purchase agreement.
  • A neighborhood security disclosure: A form disclosing the known security conditions or criminal activity affecting the property and its surrounding area.

Further, your duty to disclose your knowledge about adverse conditions cannot be waived by your placing an “as-is” disclaimer in the purchase agreement.

Property cannot be sold “as is” without disclosure. Note: you and your agent are both liable for monetary losses in pricing or costs incurred by the buyer due to the failure to disclose defects you or your agent knew or should have known existed when you entered into the purchase agreement.

Mortgage Rates Remain Relatively Flat

The rebound in homebuyer demand continued this week, driven by mortgage rates that hover near record lows. This turnaround in demand, particularly by those who have higher incomes than the typical household, also reflects deferred sales from the Spring.